The Early Drug Courts

Autor: W. C. Terry, III
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1452263272
File Size: 37,77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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A natural companion to the recently published Drug Control and the Courts (SAGE 1996), this accessible volume focuses on five case studies in judicial innovation - the dedicated drug treatment courts in Miami, Oakland, Fort Lauderdale, Portland and Phoenix. Each case is presented in a chapter written by a local expert to describe and evaluate five prime examples of dedicated drug treatment courts. These chapters are written to a common outline and each discuss the following points: community demographics; structural organization of the court; court caseloads, including drug cases; successes and failures of initial goals and objectives and subsequent adaptations; and measures of long-term successes and failures.

How Information Matters

Autor: Kathleen Hale
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 158901748X
File Size: 52,15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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How Information Matters examines the ways a network of state and local governments and nonprofit organizations can enhance the capacity for successful policy change by public administrators. Hale examines drug courts, programs that typify the highly networked, collaborative environment of public administrators today. These “special dockets” implement justice but also drug treatment, case management, drug testing, and incentive programs for non-violent offenders in lieu of jail time. In a study that spans more than two decades, Hale shows ways organizations within the network act to champion, challenge, and support policy innovations over time. Her description of interactions between courts, administrative agencies, and national organizations highlight the evolution of collaborative governance in the state and local arena, with vignettes that share specific experiences across six states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Missouri, and Tennessee) and ways that they acquired knowledge from the network to make decisions. How Information Matters offers valuable insight into successful ways for collaboration and capacity building. It will be of special interest to public administrators or policymakers who wish to identify ways to improve their own programs’ performance.

Drug Courts

Autor: James L. Nolan
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 9780202365688
File Size: 63,56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Drug courts offer offenders an intensive court-based treatment program as an alternative to the normal adjudication process. Begun in 1989, they have since spread dramatically throughout the United States. In this interdisciplinary examination of the expanding movement, a distinguished panel of legal practitioners and academics offers theoretical assessments and on-site empirical analyses of the workings of various courts in the United States, along with detailed comparisons and contrasts with related developments in Britain. Practitioners, politicians, and academics alike acknowledge the profound impact drug courts have had on the American criminal justice system. From a range of disciplinary perspectives, contributors to this volume seek to make sense of this important judicial innovation. While addressing a range of questions, Drug Courts also aims to achieve a careful balance between focused empirical studies and broader theoretical analyses of the same phenomenon. The volume maintains an analytical concentration on drug courts and on the important practical, philosophical, and jurisprudential consequences of this unique form of therapeutic jurisprudence. Drug courts depart from the practices and procedures of typical criminal courts. Prosecutors and defense counsel play much-reduced roles. Often lawyers are not even present during regular drug court sessions. Instead, the main courtroom drama is between the judge and client, both of whom speak openly and freely in the drug court setting. Often accompanying the client is a treatment provider who advises the judge and reviews the client's progress in treatment. Court sessions are characterized by expressive and sometimes tearful testimonies about the recovery process, and are often punctuated with applause from those in attendance. Taken together, the chapters provide a variety of perspectives on drug courts, and extend our knowledge of the birth and evolution of a new movement. Drug Courts is an essential reference for courses in criminology, the sociology of drugs and deviance, and the philosophy of law and punishment.

Problem Solving Courts

Autor: Paul C. Higgins
Publisher: Praeger Publishers
ISBN:
File Size: 69,51 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Explores the rise of the problem-solving court movement, the logic behind the courts, the approaches they take, and the anticipated benefits and possible negative aspects of problem-solving courts.

Handbook Of Forensic Mental Health With Victims And Offenders

Autor: David W. Springer, PhD, LCSW
Publisher: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 9780826101136
File Size: 34,99 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Designated a Doody's Core Title! Together for the first time; all your forensic social work best practice needs in one volume! "...a vitally important addition to this emerging and essential body of knowledge. This compelling publication places between two covers a broad collection of informative, original essays on core issues in forensic social work. This engaging volume offers readers keen insights into forensic practice related to child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, suicide, psychiatric care and mental illness, juvenile justice, adult corrections, addictions, trauma, and restorative justice." --from the foreword by Frederic G. Reamer, School of Social Work, Rhode Island College From expert testimony advice to treating HIV-positive incarcerated women, this handbook contains the most current research and tested field practices for child welfare through adulthood in the civil and criminal system. Encompassing a wide range of treatments, roles, specialized practices, research, and diagnoses, the Handbook of Forensic Mental Health With Victims and Offenders will guide practicing professionals through the forensic social work issues they encounter on a daily basis, such as: Prevention of prisoners' sudden deaths Expert witness testimony in child welfare and women battering Treatment of dually diagnosed adolescents The overrepresentation of African-Americans incarcerated for juvenile delinquency Jail mental health services for adults Drug courts and PTSD in inmates with substance abuse histories Recidivism prevention Basic tasks in post-trauma intervention with victims and offenders Culture and gender considerations in restorative justice Edited by Dr. Albert R. Roberts and Dr. David W. Springer, with contributions by leaders in the field, this handbook should top the list of must-have publications for all forensic social workers.

Judging Addicts

Autor: Rebecca Tiger
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814784062
File Size: 62,57 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The number of people incarcerated in the U.S. now exceeds 2.3 million, due in part to the increasing criminalization of drug use: over 25% of people incarcerated in jails and prisons are there for drug offenses. Judging Addicts examines this increased criminalization of drugs and the medicalization of addiction in the U.S. by focusing on drug courts, where defendants are sent to drug treatment instead of prison. Rebecca Tiger explores how advocates of these courts make their case for what they call “enlightened coercion,” detailing how they use medical theories of addiction to justify increased criminal justice oversight of defendants who, through this process, are defined as both “sick” and “bad.” Tiger shows how these courts fuse punitive and therapeutic approaches to drug use in the name of a “progressive” and “enlightened” approach to addiction. She critiques the medicalization of drug users, showing how the disease designation can complement, rather than contradict, punitive approaches, demonstrating that these courts are neither unprecedented nor unique, and that they contain great potential to expand punitive control over drug users. Tiger argues that the medicalization of addiction has done little to stem the punishment of drug users because of a key conceptual overlap in the medical and punitive approaches—that habitual drug use is a problem that needs to be fixed through sobriety. Judging Addicts presses policymakers to implement humane responses to persistent substance use that remove its control entirely from the criminal justice system and ultimately explores the nature of crime and punishment in the U.S. today.