Hodges Scout

Autor: Len Travers
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421418053
File Size: 67,86 MB
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"Many Americans probably know the French and Indian War by way of the film adaptation (1992) of Cooper's Last of the Mohicans. In it Michael Mann directs the young Daniel Day-Lewis and, in parts, succeeds in capturing the strange solitude of warring in endless forest and the sudden ferocity of battle during this first truly world war. Writing an unusual work of art and history, Len Travers here excavates the story of a colonial-American 'lost patrol' during that war, turning musty documents into a gripping tale that could reach well beyond an academic readership. Fifty provinical soldiers left the fringes of settlement in fall, 1756, aiming to safeguard the upper reaches of New York. Within days, near Lake George, native warriors, allies of the French, jumped them. Surprised and overwhelmed, the colonists suffered death or capture. The fifteen surviviors lived for years as prisoners of their native captors. Eventually a few of them managed to work their back to their villages and families, living to tell their stories. Travers's remarkable research brings human experiences alive, giving us a rare, full color view of the French and Indian War. These personal accounts throw light on the motives, means, and methods of both colonists and Natives at war in the American wilderness. They also speak to the nature of war itself"--

Rustic Warriors

Autor: Steven Eames
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814722709
File Size: 32,39 MB
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In April of 2001, the headline in the Los Angeles Timesread, “Doubting the Story of the Exodus.” It covered a sermon that had been delivered by the rabbi of a prominent local congregation over the holiday of Passover. In it, he said, “The truth is that virtually every modern archeologist who has investigated the story of the exodus, with very few exceptions, agrees that the way the Bible describes the exodus is not the way it happened, if it happened at all.” This seeming challenge to the biblical story captivated the local public. Yet as the rabbi himself acknowledged, his sermon contained nothing new. The theories that he described had been common knowledge among biblical scholars for over thirty years, though few people outside of the profession know their relevance.New understandings concerning the Bible have not filtered down beyond specialists in university settings. There is a need to communicate this research to a wider public of students and educated readers outside of the academy. This volume seeks to meet this need, with accessible and engaging chapters describing how archeology, theology, ancient studies, literary studies, feminist studies, and other disciplines now understand the Bible.

Bloody Mohawk

Autor: Richard J. Berleth
Publisher: Black Dome Press
ISBN: 9781883789664
File Size: 76,42 MB
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This sweeping historical narrative chronicles events instrumental in the painful birth of a new nation—from the Bloody Morning Scout and the massacre at Fort William Henry to the disastrous siege of Quebec, the heroic but lopsided Battle of Valcour Island, the horrors of Oriskany, and the tragedies of Pennsylvania's Wyoming Valley massacre and the Sullivan-Clinton Expedition's destruction of the Iroquois homeland in western New York State. Caught in the middle of it all was the Mohawk River Valley. Berleth explores the relationship of early settlers on the Mohawk frontier to the Iroquoian people who made their homes beside the great river. He introduces colonists and native leaders in all their diversity of culture and belief. Dramatic profiles of key participants provide perspectives through which contemporaries struggled to understand events. Sir William Johnson is here first as a shopkeeper and farmer, then as a brother Mohawk and militia leader, and lastly as a crown official charged with supervising North American Indian affairs. We watch Johnson in his final years wrestling with Indian war and the unraveling of British America. We meet the frontier ambassador Conrad Weiser, survivor of the Palatine immigration, who agreed not at all with Johnson or his party. And we encounter the young missionary, Samuel Kirkland, as he leaves Johnson's household for a fateful sojourn among the Senecas.Johnson's heirs did much to precipitate the outbreak of violent hostilities along the Mohawk in the first months of the War of Independence. Berleth shows how the Johnson family early sought to save their patrimony in the valley just as patriot forces maneuvered to win Native American support or, at least, neutrality. When Joseph Brant, Thayendanegea, rushed Native Americans to war behind the British, it fell to General Philip Schuyler, wealthy scion of an old Albany family, to find a way to protect the Mohawk region from British incursion. His invasion of Canada fails; his tattered army fights at Valcour Island, Ticonderoga, Hubbardton, retreating steadily. Not until on the line of the Mohawk is the enemy stopped.But the battles of Oriskany, Fort Stanwix, Saratoga, and Bennington do not end the fighting in upstate New York. As the national effort moves elsewhere, the Mohawk Valley plunges into bitter internecine conflict. Raids and ambushes go on for four more years until, in the end, the level of destruction from Tory actions and Brant's war parties staggers the imagination. Two out of every three inhabitants are dead, captured, or missing; farms and villages are laid waste. Charred ruins replace once-prosperous communities in Cobleskill, Cherry Valley, Andrustown, German Flats, Vroomansland, Neversink, Little Falls, Johnstown, Schoharie, Middleburgh, some never to be rebuilt. The villages of the Oneidas, America's first allies, have been leveled by their former brothers in the Iroquois Confederation. Bloody Mohawk leaves us to ponder the roots of civil war in nonnegotiable ethnic and cultural misunderstandings. It offers a glance into an aspect of New York State history often overlooked.

Barbarians And Brothers

Autor: Wayne E. Lee
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019937645X
File Size: 34,70 MB
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An exploration of early modern English and American warfare discusses how issues of ethnicity, logistics, and culture determined the nature of the fighting and contributed to the development of contemporary attitudes toward war.

Massacre On The Merrimack

Autor: Jay Atkinson
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1493018175
File Size: 71,99 MB
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Early on March 15, 1697, a band of Abenaki warriors in service to the French raided the English frontier village of Haverhill, Massachusetts. Striking swiftly, the Abenaki killed twenty-seven men, women, and children, and took thirteen captives, including thirty-nine-year-old Hannah Duston and her week-old daughter, Martha. A short distance from the village, one of the warriors murdered the squalling infant by dashing her head against a tree. After a forced march of nearly one hundred miles, Duston and two companions were transferred to a smaller band of Abenaki, who camped on a tiny island located at the junction of the Merrimack and Contoocook Rivers, several miles north of present day Concord, New Hampshire. This was the height of King William’s War, both a war of terror and a religious contest, with English Protestantism vying for control of the New World with French Catholicism. After witnessing her infant’s murder, Duston resolved to get even. Two weeks into their captivity, Duston and her companions, a fifty-one-year-old woman and a twelve-year-old boy, moved among the sleeping Abenaki with tomahawks and knives, killing two men, two women, and six children. After returning to the bloody scene alone to scalp their victims, Duston and the others escaped down the Merrimack River in a stolen canoe. They braved treacherous waters and the constant threat of attack and recapture, returning to tell their story and collect a bounty for the scalps. Was Hannah Duston the prototypical feminist avenger, or the harbinger of the Native American genocide? In this meticulously researched and riveting narrative, bestselling author Jay Atkinson sheds new light on the early struggle for North America.

King William S War

Autor: Michael G. Laramie
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781594162886
File Size: 11,51 MB
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King William's War encompassed several proxy wars being fought by the English and the French through their native allies: the Beaver Wars, a long running feud between the Iroquois Confederacy, New France, and New France's native allies over control of the lucrative fur trade, and the second Wabanaki War between New England colonists and the pro-French Wabanaki of Maine, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick. These two conflicts officially became one with the arrival of news of a declaration of war between France and England in 1689. The next nine years saw coordinated attacks, including French assaults on Schenectady, New York, and Massachusetts, and English attacks around Montreal and on Nova Scotia. The war ended diplomatically, but started again five years later in Queen Anne's War. A riveting history full of memorable characters and events, and supported by extensive primary source material, King William's War: The First Contest for North America, 1689-1697 by Michael G. Laramie is the first book-length treatment of a war that proved crucial to the future of North America.

The Battle Of Lake George

Autor: William R. Griffith IV
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625857578
File Size: 46,18 MB
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In the early morning of September 8, 1755, a force of French Regulars, Canadians and Indians crouched unseen in a ravine south of Lake George. Under the command of French general Jean-Armand, Baron de Dieskau, the men ambushed the approaching British forces, sparking a bloody conflict for control of the lake and its access to New York’s interior. Against all odds, British commander William Johnson rallied his men through the barrage of enemy fire to send the French retreating north to Ticonderoga. The stage was set for one of the most contested regions throughout the rest of the conflict. Historian William Griffith recounts the thrilling history behind the first major British battlefield victory of the French and Indian War.

A Bloodless Victory

Autor: Joseph F. Stoltz III
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421423030
File Size: 30,81 MB
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Once celebrated on par with the Fourth of July, January 8th—the anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans—is no longer a day of reverence for most Americans. Although the United States’ stunning 1815 defeat of the British army south of New Orleans gave rise to the presidency of Andrew Jackson, the Democratic Party, and the legend of Jean Laffite, the battle has not been a national holiday since 1861. Joseph F. Stoltz III explores how generations of Americans have consciously revised, reinterpreted, and reexamined the memory of the conflict to fit the cultural and social needs of their time. Combining archival research with deep analyses of music, literature, theater, and film across two centuries of American popular culture, Stoltz highlights the myriad ways in which politicians, artists, academics, and ordinary people have rewritten the battle’s history. While these efforts could be nefarious—or driven by political necessity or racial animus—far more often they were simply part of each generations’ expression of values and world view. From Andrew Jackson’s presidential campaign to the occupation of New Orleans by the Union Army to the Jim Crow era, the continuing reinterpretations of the battle alienated whole segments of the American population from its memorialization. Thus, a close look at the Battle of New Orleans offers an opportunity to explore not just how events are collectively remembered across generations but also how a society discards memorialization efforts it no longer finds necessary or palatable.

Braddock S Defeat

Autor: David L. Preston
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199845328
File Size: 69,16 MB
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On July 9, 1755, British and colonial troops under the command of General Edward Braddock suffered a crushing defeat to French and Native American enemy forces in Ohio Country. Known as the Battle of the Monongahela, the loss altered the trajectory of the Seven Years' War in America, escalating the fighting and shifting the balance of power. An unprecedented rout of a modern and powerful British army by a predominantly Indian force, Monongahela shocked the colonial world--and also planted the first seeds of an independent American consciousness. The culmination of a failed attempt to capture Fort Duquesne from the French, Braddock's Defeat was a pivotal moment in American and world history. While the defeat is often blamed on blundering and arrogance on the part of General Braddock--who was wounded in battle and died the next day--David Preston's gripping new work argues that such a claim diminishes the victory that Indian and French forces won by their superior discipline and leadership. In fact, the French Canadian officer Captain Beaujeu had greater tactical skill, reconnaissance, and execution, and his Indian allies were the most effective and disciplined troops on the field. Preston also explores the long shadow cast by Braddock's Defeat over the 18th century and the American Revolution two decades later. The campaign had been an awakening to empire for many British Americans, spawning ideas of American identity and anticipating many of the political and social divisions that would erupt with the outbreak of the Revolution. Braddock's Defeat was the defining generational experience for many British and American officers, including Thomas Gage, Horatio Gates, and perhaps most significantly, George Washington. A rich battle history driven by a gripping narrative and an abundance of new evidence,Braddock's Defeat presents the fullest account yet of this defining moment in early American history.

French Indian Wars In Maine

Autor: Michael Dekker
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625855745
File Size: 15,18 MB
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For eight decades, an epic power struggle raged across a frontier that would become Maine. Between 1675 and 1759, British, French and Native Americans clashed in six distinct wars to stake and defend their land claims. Though the showdown between France and Great Britain was international in scale, the decidedly local conflicts in Maine pitted European settlers against Native American tribes. Native and European communities from the Penobscot to the Piscataqua Rivers suffered savage attacks. Countless men, women and children were killed, taken captive or sold into servitude. The native people of Maine were torn asunder by disease, social disintegration and political factionalism as they fought to maintain their autonomy in the face of unrelenting European pressure. This dark, tragic and largely forgotten struggle laid the foundation of Maine.