Archaeology Heritage And Civic Engagement

Autor: Barbara J Little
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315433591
File Size: 77,80 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 9323
Download or Read Book
The definition of “public archaeology” has expanded in recent years to include archaeologists’ collaborations with and within communities and activities in support of education, civic renewal, peacebuilding, and social justice. Barbara Little and Paul Shackel, long-term leaders in the growth of a civically-engaged, relevant archaeology, outline a future trajectory for the field in this concise, thoughtful volume. Drawing from the archaeological study of race and labor, among other examples, the authors explore this crucial opportunity and responsibility, then point the way for the discipline to contribute to the contemporary public good.

Heritage In Action

Autor: Helaine Silverman
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319428705
File Size: 46,98 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 6425
Download or Read Book
In this textbook we see heritage in action in indigenous and vernacular communities, in urban development and regeneration schemes, in expressions of community, in acts of nostalgia and memorialization and counteracts of forgetting, in museums and other spaces of representation, in tourism, in the offices of those making public policy, and in the politics of identity and claims toward cultural property. Whether renowned or local, tangible or intangible, the entire heritage enterprise, at whatever scale, is by now inextricably embedded in “value”. The global context requires a sanguine approach to heritage in which the so-called critical stance is not just theorized in a rarefied sphere of scholarly lexical gymnastics, but practically engaged and seen to be doing things in the world.

Public Archaeology

Autor: Nick Merriman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134513429
File Size: 73,45 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 4215
Download or Read Book
Scrutinizing, in detail, the relationship between archaeology, heritage and the public, this much-needed volume explores public interest and participation in archaeology as a subject worthy of academic attention in its own right. Examining case studies from throughout the world; from North America, Britain, Egypt and Brazil to East Africa, China and beyond, Nick Merriman focuses on two key areas: communication and interpretation, and stakeholders. Constant reports of new discoveries, protests over the destruction of sites and debates over the return of artefacts such as the Elgin marbles or indigenous remains testify to an increasing public interest in archaeology. For students and scholars of this archaeology, and of its relationship with the public, this will prove essential reading.

Archaeology As A Tool Of Civic Engagement

Autor: Barbara J. Little
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 0759113777
File Size: 22,86 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 6142
Download or Read Book
Little and Shackel use case studies from different regions across the world to challenge archaeologists to create an ethical public archaeology that is concerned not just with the management of cultural resources, but with social justice and civic responsibility.

Historical Archaeology

Autor: Barbara J Little
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315427397
File Size: 35,53 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 8989
Download or Read Book
What is historical archaeology and why is it important? Well-known archaeologist Barbara Little addresses these key questions for introductory students in this concise, inexpensive, and well-written text. Little covers the goals of historical archaeological work, the kinds of questions it asks, and the ethical and political concerns it raises. She shows what historical archaeology can provide that neither of its parent disciplines can offer alone. Little offers brief snapshots of key American sites: Jamestown, Mission San Luis, West Oakland, the African American Burial Ground, and the Garbage Project, among others. And she shows how historical archaeology is inextricably linked to public education, justice issues, and our collective understanding of the past. As an introductory guide for historical archaeology and similar courses, or as thought-provoking reading for professionals, this volume is unmatched in quality and scope.

Remembering Lattimer

Autor: Paul A. Shackel
Publisher: Working Class in American Hist
ISBN: 9780252041990
File Size: 21,90 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 1621
Download or Read Book
On September 10, 1897, a group of 400 striking coal miners--workers of Polish, Slovak, and Lithuanian descent or origin--marched on Lattimer, Pennsylvania. There, law enforcement officers fired without warning into the protesters, killing nineteen miners and wounding thirty-eight others. The bloody day quickly faded into history. Paul A. Shackel confronts the legacies and lessons of the Lattimer event. Beginning with a dramatic retelling of the incident, Shackel traces how the violence, and the acquittal of the deputies who perpetrated it, spurred membership in the United Mine Workers. By blending archival and archaeological research with interviews, he weighs how the people living in the region remember--and forget--what happened. Now in positions of power, the descendants of the slain miners have themselves become rabidly anti-labor and anti-immigrant as Dominicans and other Latinos change the community. Shackel shows how the social, economic, and political circumstances surrounding historic Lattimer connect in profound ways to the riven communities of today. Compelling and timely, Remembering Lattimer restores an American tragedy to our public memory.

Public Benefits Of Archaeology

Autor: Barbara J. Little
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813029214
File Size: 32,50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 1062
Download or Read Book
"It is no longer a question that conducting archaeology with an eye toward the general public is important for the discipline. What Little has accomplished in this volume is to push the dialogue further in exploring both why it is important to a nonarchaeology audience and how it is important in our world today."--Mark Warner, University of Idaho Little brings together an unprecedented mix of authors from all aspects of the profession, as well as several non-archaeologists, who address the broad range of contributions that archaeology makes beyond research. Their discussion confronts the issue of exactly who the public is and why it should care about archaeology at all. These authors prove, in exploring diverse cross-sections of the public, that archaeology plays a crucial role in providing an authentic past, opportunities for critical thinking, and multicultural education. The eclectic nature of the collection allows for a thorough exploration of major issues central to the conduct of archaeological scholarship: museum and site interpretation, site preservation, education, media relations, descendant communities, and politics and public policy. Contents Foreword: The Value of Archaeology, by Roger G. Kennedy Part I. Finding Common Ground 1. Archaeology as a Shared Vision, by Barbara J. Little 2. Public Benefits of Archaeological Research, by William D. Lipe Part II. Many Publics, Many Benefits 3. Heritage, History, and Archaeological Educators, by Francis P. McManamon 4. Hopi Understanding of the Past: A Collaborative Approach, by Leigh (Jenkins) Kuwanwisiwma 5. Neat Stuff and Good Stories: Interpreting Historical Archaeology in Two Local Communities, by Adrian Praetzellis 6. Underwater Heritage and the Diving Community, by Lynn Harris 7. On the Power of Historical Archaeology to Change Historians' Minds about the Past, by James P. Whittenburg 8. Garbology: The Archaeology of Fresh Garbage, by W. L. Rathje 9. Empowerment, Ecology, and Evidence: The Relevance of Mortuary Archaeology to the Public, by Thomas A. J. Crist Part III. Learning from an Authentic Past 10. Protecting the Past to Benefit the Public, by George S. Smith and John E. Ehrenhard 11. Roadside Ruins: Does America Still Need Archaeology Museums? by David Hurst Thomas 12. Archaeology and Tourism at Mount Vernon, by Esther C. White 13. Broadening the Interpretations of the Past at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, by Paul A. Shackel 14. Myths, Lies, and Videotapes: Information as Antidote to Social Studies Classrooms and Pop Culture, by Fay Metcalf 15. Project Archaeology: Putting the Intrigue of the Past in Public Education, by Jeanne M. Moe 16. Pursuing the ZiNj Strategy Like There's No Tomorrow, by Kevin T. Jones and Julie E. Maurer Longstreth Part IV. Promoting the Public Benefits of Archaeology 17. Irreplaceable Heritage: Archaeology and the National Register of Historic Places, by Carol D. Shull 18. Archaeology in Santa Fe: A Public-Private Balancing Act, by Mary Grzeskowiak Ragins 19. Potsherds and Politics, by Terry Goddard 20. Archaeology and the Tourism Train, by Katherine Slick 21. The Web of Archaeology: Its Many Values and Opportunities, by S. Terry Childs 22. The Archaeologist as Storyteller, by Peter A. Young 23. Reaching the Hidden Audience: Ten Rules for the Archaeological Writer, by Mitch Allen Epilogue, by Brian M. Fagan Barbara J. Little is an archaeologist for the National Park Service.

Teaching History For The Common Good

Autor: Keith C. Barton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135645132
File Size: 52,64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 7897
Download or Read Book
In Teaching History for the Common Good, Barton and Levstik present a clear overview of competing ideas among educators, historians, politicians, and the public about the nature and purpose of teaching history, and they evaluate these debates in light of current research on students' historical thinking. In many cases, disagreements about what should be taught to the nation's children and how it should be presented reflect fundamental differences that will not easily be resolved. A central premise of this book, though, is that systematic theory and research can play an important role in such debates by providing evidence of how students think, how their ideas interact with the information they encounter both in school and out, and how these ideas differ across contexts. Such evidence is needed as an alternative to the untested assumptions that plague so many discussions of history education. The authors review research on students' historical thinking and set it in the theoretical context of mediated action--an approach that calls attention to the concrete actions that people undertake, the human agents responsible for such actions, the cultural tools that aid and constrain them, their purposes, and their social contexts. They explain how this theory allows educators to address the breadth of practices, settings, purposes, and tools that influence students' developing understanding of the past, as well as how it provides an alternative to the academic discipline of history as a way of making decisions about teaching and learning the subject in schools. Beyond simply describing the factors that influence students' thinking, Barton and Levstik evaluate their implications for historical understanding and civic engagement. They base these evaluations not on the disciplinary study of history, but on the purpose of social education--preparing students for participation in a pluralist democracy. Their ultimate concern is how history can help citizens engage in collaboration toward the common good. In Teaching History for the Common Good, Barton and Levstik: *discuss the contribution of theory and research, explain the theory of mediated action and how it guides their analysis, and describe research on children's (and adults') knowledge of and interest in history; *lay out a vision of pluralist, participatory democracy and its relationship to the humanistic study of history as a basis for evaluating the perspectives on the past that influence students' learning; *explore four principal "stances" toward history (identification, analysis, moral response, and exhibition), review research on the extent to which children and adolescents understand and accept each of these, and examine how the stances might contribute to--or detract from--participation in a pluralist democracy; *address six of the principal "tools" of history (narrative structure, stories of individual achievement and motivation, national narratives, inquiry, empathy as perspective-taking, and empathy as caring); and *review research and conventional wisdom on teachers' knowledge and practice, and argue that for teachers to embrace investigative, multi-perspectival approaches to history they need more than knowledge of content and pedagogy, they need a guiding purpose that can be fulfilled only by these approaches--and preparation for participatory democracy provides such purpose. Teaching History for the Common Good is essential reading for history and social studies professionals, researchers, teacher educators, and students, as well as for policymakers, parents, and members of the general public who are interested in history education or in students' thinking and learning about the subject.

The African Burial Ground In New York City

Autor: Andrea E. Frohne
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
ISBN: 0815634307
File Size: 66,34 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 8406
Download or Read Book
In 1991, archaeologists in lower Manhattan unearthed a stunning discovery. Buried for more than 200 years was a communal cemetery containing the remains of up to 20,000 people. At roughly 6.6 acres, the African Burial Ground is the largest and earliest known burial space of African descendants in North America. In the years that followed its discovery, citizens and activists fought tirelessly to demand respectful treatment of eighteenth-century funerary remains and sacred ancestors. After more than a decade of political battle-on local and national levels-and scientific research at Howard University, the remains were eventually reburied on the site in 2003. Capturing the varied perspectives and the emotional tenor of the time, Frohne narrates the story of the African Burial Ground and the controversies surrounding urban commemoration. She analyzes both its colonial and contemporary representations, drawing on colonial-era maps, prints, and land surveys to illuminate the forgotten and hidden visual histories of a mostly enslaved population buried in the African Burial Ground. Today, personal offerings and commemorative artworks, many of which incorporate traditional African and diasporic arts and religions, pay tribute to the ancestors and the sacred space. Tracing the history and identity of the area from a forgotten site to a contested and negotiated space, Frohne situates the burial ground within the context of late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century race relations in New York City to reveal its enduring presence as a spiritual place. Finally, she illustrates visually, spiritually, and spatially the historic and contemporary formation of a New York City African diaspora in relation to the African Burial Ground.